Are you a college student looking for a cool career? Have you considered being a Lighting Engineer?

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Lighting Engineer as a Career
Lighting engineers, and the companies that employ them, are focused on the development of energy-efficient lighting. Artificial lighting in homes and offices accounts for nearly 50% of total energy consumed. For some buildings, more than 90% of lighting energy consumed can be an unnecessary expense, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. These days, lighting engineers are particularly focused on LED (light emitting diode) applications, which use far less energy than traditional technologies. LED lighting is now used in traffic lights and billboards. Some lighting engineers work on new design and manufacturing techniques that lower these costs, while others develop entirely new applications, such as the recently introduced LED Christmas lights.

Required Skills
Someone wishing to enter this field must have a strong aptitude for math and physics. Additionally, the push for green innovation necessitates a highly curious, tenacious mindset that can apply fundamentals of electrical engineering in novel ways to develop the next generation of clean, efficient lighting. As part of that process, lighting engineers should be able to work both collaboratively and independently to achieve breakthroughs. Additionally, LEED certification (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) is highly encouraged. Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council, it signifies knowledge of green building design, construction and operations.

 Career and Economic Outlook
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that demand for all electrical engineers should increase slower than the average, by 1%, from 2014-2024. Those with green technology skills, like the LEED certification, will be highly sought after as companies compete to transform their traditional technology to energy-efficient products. Median 2015 earnings for all electrical engineers were $93,010.

Lighting engineers, and the companies that employ them, are focused on the development of energy-efficient lighting. Artificial lighting in homes and offices accounts for nearly 50% of total energy consumed. For some buildings, more than 90% of lighting energy consumed can be an unnecessary expense, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. These days, lighting engineers are particularly focused on LED (light emitting diode) applications, which use far less energy than traditional technologies. LED lighting is now used in traffic lights and billboards. Some lighting engineers work on new design and manufacturing techniques that lower these costs, while others develop entirely new applications, such as the recently introduced LED Christmas lights.

Required Skills
Someone wishing to enter this field must have a strong aptitude for math and physics. Additionally, the push for green innovation necessitates a highly curious, tenacious mindset that can apply fundamentals of electrical engineering in novel ways to develop the next generation of clean, efficient lighting. As part of that process, lighting engineers should be able to work both collaboratively and independently to achieve breakthroughs. Additionally, LEED certification (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) is highly encouraged. Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council, it signifies knowledge of green building design, construction and operations.

Career and Economic Outlook
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that demand for all electrical engineers should increase slower than the average, by 1%, from 2014-2024. Those with green technology skills, like the LEED certification, will be highly sought after as companies compete to transform their traditional technology to energy-efficient products. Median 2015 earnings for all electrical engineers were $93,010.